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MN Supreme Court Says Mayor Must Hire More Minneapolis Police

The Minnesota Supreme Court ruled that the mayor of Minneapolis hasn’t met a legal duty to hire more police officers or demonstrate why he hasn’t done so. Chief Justice Lorie Gildea said Mayor Jacob Frey has a “clear legal duty” under the city’s charter to staff the department with at least 731 sworn officers, a number based on the city's population, the Associated Press reports. Interim City Attorney Peter Ginder said the city has about 300 fewer officers than it did before George Floyd was killed by police in May 2020. The city’s former police chief attributed the departures to retirements and officers who filed disability claims, some citing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder linked to the protests over Floyd’s killing. Ginder calls it “an unprecedented loss of personnel that is not easily corrected,” but noted that the city has provided funding for more recruit classes and hiring bonuses.


Eight residents concerned about crime sought a court order to force the city to hire more police as required by the charter. The Supreme Court heard them argue that the current staffing is about 120 officers fewer than they believed was required. Minneapolis attorneys argued that the charter requirement relates only to funding, but the mayor still may determine how the money may be used within the department. The killing of Floyd, who was Black, led to a reckoning over police brutality and discrimination involving people of color. Derek Chauvin, a white police officer who pinned Floyd’s neck to the pavement with his knee, was convicted last year of murder. Another former officer pleaded guilty in May to a state charge of aiding and abetting second-degree manslaughter. Two other two former officers are awaiting trial scheduled for October on state charges.

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