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MI Prosecutors Seek 10-Year Term For School Shooter's Parents

Michigan prosecutors are calling for at least 10 years in prison for two parents who are the first to be held criminally responsible for a school shooting. Jennifer Crumbley showed a “chilling lack of remorse” for her role, and James Crumbley “failed to exercise even the smallest measure of ordinary care” that could have prevented the deaths of four students at Oxford High School in 2021, prosecutors told a judge Wednesday, the Associated Press reports. The Crumbleys, the parents of shooter Ethan Crumbley, were convicted of involuntary manslaughter this year. They were not accused of knowing their son’s plan, but prosecutors said they failed to lock up a gun at home and ignored his mental health. The maximum prison term for the crime is 15 years. The minimum sentence set by the judge on Tuesday will be critical because the Crumbleys would be eligible for parole consideration after that time. They will get credit for about 2 1/2 years spent in the Oakland County jail since their arrest.


Prosecutors said Jennifer Crumbley, 46, is hoping to avoid prison and instead be fitted with an electronic tether and live with her attorney, Shannon Smith. They said James Crumbley, 47, also hopes to be released. “Such a proposed sentence is a slap in the face to the severity of tragedy caused by defendant’s gross negligence, the victims and their families,” prosecutor Marc Keast said, referring to Jennifer Crumbley. On the day of the shooting, the Crumbleys went to the school to discuss Ethan’s morbid drawing of a gun, a bullet, a wounded figure and phrases such as, “The thoughts won’t stop. Help me.” Instead of taking their son home, the Crumbleys left with a list of contacts for mental health services and returned to work. A few hours later, Ethan, 15 at the time, pulled a Sig Sauer 9 mm handgun from his backpack and began shooting.

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