25-254282_search-button-icon-png-transparent-png-removebg-preview.png
download (1).png
No Result Found

Crime and Justice News Archive

Welcome to the Crime and Justice News Archive. You can browse through all the recent posts, click on tags, or search the archive for something in particular!

All Posts

61140-removebg-preview.png
copy-link-icon-27-removebg-preview.png

Crime and Justice News

0 days ago

208 words

.

Biden Has Mixed Record on Justice Reform, Says Brennan Center

It is "especially disappointing" that the Biden administration has not made more progress on criminal justice reform during its first year in office, the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University's law school says in a new report. Biden promised during his campaign to "reform our criminal justice system.” but Brennan concludes that "some progress has been made — but significant missed opportunities remain.. Focusing on corrections issues, the center says that little or no progress has been made on overhauling the federal clemency process or revitalizing the U.S. Sentencing Commission. The report says there have been "limited policy changes" implementing the 2018 First Step act and improving the Bureau of Prisons, eliminating the federal death penalty and limiting federal use of private, for-profit prisons and detention centers. Brennan cites "notable progress" in expanding use of federal home confinement for convicts, nominating U.S. Attorneys and federal judges and "commitment to funding community anti-violence programs.: The center notes that as of Jan. 10, there were more than 18,400 clemency petitions awaiting presidential action. Brennan says Biden should expand the Community Violence Intervention Collaborative beyond its set, 18-month period and locations and adds, "There should be opportunities for changes if organizations feel that their needs are not being met."...

4

views

0

61140-removebg-preview.png
copy-link-icon-27-removebg-preview.png

Crime and Justice News

0 days ago

300 words

.

NYC's Adams Announces An Ambitious Public Safety Plan

New York City Mayor Eric Adams, facing severe pressure to address a growing crisis of gun violence, announced an ambitious public safety plan in what the New York Times says has quickly become a pivotal moment in his first weeks in office. In a speech three days after a police officer was killed in Manhattan, Adams called for immediate changes to add police officers to city streets to remove guns, and for help from the courts and state lawmakers in the months ahead. “We will not surrender our city to the violent few,” Adams said. His plan included the restoration of an anti-gun police unit, and he called on state lawmakers to make a number of changes, including to the state law and to a law that altered how the state handles teenage defendants. “I want to be clear: This is not just a plan for the future — it is a plan for right now,” the mayor said. “Gun violence is a public health crisis. There is no time to wait.” Gun violence rose sharply during the pandemic, as historic lows gave way to the highest number of shootings in a decade. The murder total approached 500 in 2021. The totals were far from the worst days in the early 1990s, but they fueled fears that helped propel Adams to a victory last year with a promise to improve safety.
The spate of high-profile shootings, including four incidents in which police officers were wounded this year, has continued to change the tenor of criminal justice discussions and policy. Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg said he would aggressively prosecute gun-related crimes, including possession — a seeming response to pushback against his adoption of lenient policies upon taking office. He said during his campaign last year that he would avoid...

1

views

0

61140-removebg-preview.png
copy-link-icon-27-removebg-preview.png

Crime and Justice News

0 days ago

226 words

.

States Passed 152 Laws Last Year To Help People With Criminal Records

The campaign to improve the reintegration into society for those with criminal records "has seemed more than ever grounded in economic imperatives, as pandemic dislocations have brought home the need to support, train, and recruit workers who are essential to rebuilding the businesses that are the lifeblood of the economy," says the Collateral Consequences Resource Center in its annual report. The center says that, " If there is any one thing that will end unwarranted discrimination against people with a criminal history, it is a recognition that it does not pay." The center says that 40 states, Washington, D.C., and the federal government enacted 152 bills to restore rights to restore rights and opportunities to people with records Among the actions, 36 states passed 93 laws on public access to individual criminal records. Most laws established or expanded laws authorizing expungement, sealing, or set-aside of convictions or arrest records. Several states enacted judicial record clearing laws for the first time, and a number of states authorized “clean slate” automatic clearing. Executive pardoning was revived in several states where it had been dormant. Seventeen states enacted 26 laws regulating employment and occupational licensing, and more than a dozen other states enacted laws improving access to housing, education, driver’s licenses, and public benefits. Fur states took steps to restore voting rights on release from prison....

2

views

0