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Crime and Justice News Archive

Welcome to the Crime and Justice News Archive. You can browse through all the recent posts, click on tags, or search the archive for something in particular!

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Crime and Justice News

6 days ago

2 min

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Half of States Will Ban All or Most Abortions Under Court Ruling

The fall of Roe v. Wade will upend a half-century of reproductive health care across the U.S., changing where and how women access abortion and their decisions on whether to have children. Women’s reproductive lives look far different from 1973. Rates of legal abortion soared before declining somewhat in recent years, access to contraception has increased and adoption rates have dropped, reports the Wall Street Journal. Many women have come to see abortion as integral to the advances they have made in education and the workforce over five decades. Now, about half the states are expected to ban all or most abortions. Abortion clinics in conservative states are preparing to close, while clinics in more liberal areas and medication abortion providers brace for a surge in demand. “We’re talking about a scenario in which there is a dramatic increase in inequality in access to abortion,” said Caitlin Myers, an economics professor at Middlebury College who studies abortion access. Texas, Oklahoma and Kentucky have passed laws temporarily or permanently suspending access to most abortions, providing a preview of what life could look like in some two dozen states post-Roe. An analysis by Myers found that about 100,000 women trying to get an abortion wouldn’t be able to access an abortion provider because of the increased distances they would have to travel in the year after the court’s decision. About 75,000 of those women would likely give birth as a result, she said.

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Crime and Justice News

6 days ago

2 min

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Police Perpetuate Homelessness By Making Arrests

The combination of a mental health crisis and a decade-long real estate boom have created a new, especially vulnerable, visible generation of the unhoused in West Coast cities. Over the 2009-2019 decade, unsheltered homelessness continued to grow in California, Oregon and Washington, even as it declined in major cities outside the West Coast. The increase is leading to the vast criminalization of the homeless for largely nonviolent violations and generating unaffordable fines for unhoused individuals, sapping police resources and failing to address the core problems fueling homelessness, Reveal News reports. Although the homeless population in all the cities reviewed was less than two percent of the overall population, they accounted for anywhere from seven percent of arrests in Oakland to about half of all arrests in Portland. In San Diego, police used one municipal code violation more than any other from 2013 to 2020: a law, intended to force residents to clear their trash cans from the street, that has been transformed to cite and arrest unhoused people for taking up public space with their possessions. Reveal found the driving force behind arrests often isn’t proactive police enforcement, but residents reporting that a person is making them feel unsafe, refusing to leave the area, or leaving trash and other items behind. A criminal record can complicate getting a job, housing or social services for unhoused people. Some cities have begun programs to divert these calls to unarmed social workers, but the programs are still limited in scope and funding.

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Crime and Justice News

6 days ago

2 min

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Trump Badgered DOJ Over 2020 Corrupt Election Claims

Former President Trump pressured the Justice Department to pursue false allegations of election fraud, witnesses testified Thursday to the House panel investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, Capitol riot, Associated Press reports. Justice Department officials recounted Trump's repeatedly pestering them to investigate the election, which he said Democrat Joe Biden had stolen. These arguments continued despite no evidence of election fraud. The Justice Department is independent from the White House, and Trump’s constant badgering was described as a breach of protocol. Trump’s Republican allies in Congress supported stolen election claims but several sought pardons after the Jan. 6 insurrection. Jeffrey Rosen, the attorney general during the final days of the Trump administration, said he met with Trump almost daily for two weeks. Trump expressed dissatisfaction with the Justice Department rejecting his election fraud claims. Trump then met Jeffrey Clark, the former assistant attorney general for the Environment and Natural Resources Division. Clark was a strong ally, willing to do anything for Trump. Trump considered replacing Rosen with Clark but was warned in a meeting on Jan. 3, 2021 that doing so would have resulted in mass resignations of high DOJ officials. The panel is working to prove that Trump’s election fraud claims resulted in the insurrection. Several GOP representatives were also involved in efforts to reject the electoral tally, includinb Reps. Scott Perry of Pennsylvania, Andy Biggs of Arizona, Mo Brooks of Alabama, Matt Gaetz of Florida and Louie Gohmert of Texas.

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