top of page

Welcome to Crime and Justice News

Trucker Stalks Software Engineer, Kills Her, Her Husband, Himself

A Texas longhaul truck driver who became obsessed with a software engineer in Washington state after meeting her through a social media chatroom app killed her, her husband and himself after stalking them for months, the Associated Press reports. Zohreh Sadeghi, 33, and her husband, Mohammad Milad Naseri, 35, were shot to death in their suburban Seattle home by Ramin Khodakaramrezaei, 38, said Redmond Police Chief Darrell Lowe. He said officers spent a week trying to serve a protection order on Khodakaramrezaei but had not been able to find him. "This is the absolute worst outcome for a stalking case,” Lowe said. “This is every victim, every detective, every police chief’s worst nightmare.”


Police said the suspect began communicating with Sadeghi after listening to her podcasts. The two became acquainted because he heard her in an audio chatroom on the app Clubhouse, where she facilitated a discussion for Farsi speakers seeking work in the tech industry. Sadeghi’s mother called police around 1:45 a.m. Friday after escaping the home and running to a neighbor’s house. Arriving officers saw Naseri collapse in the doorway of the home, discovering he had been shot. They performed CPR, but he died at the scene. Inside the home, officers found Sadeghi and the suspect dead. Khodakaramrezaei befriended Sadeghi in the online chat room in late 2021. The two met in person last summer before the contacts escalated into harassing phone calls and threats in the fall. At one point he showed up at their home unwanted with flowers. As the stalker’s behavior intensified, Redmond Police filed a complaint against him on March 2, and Sadeghi and Naseri obtained a protection order the next day. Sadeghi tried to cut off contact with Khodakaramrezaei but harassment continued, so she contacted police in December and again in January after his actions intensified.

20 views

Recent Posts

See All

A daily report co-sponsored by Arizona State University, Criminal Justice Journalists, and the National Criminal Justice Association

bottom of page