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Corrections Officer Sentenced to Year in Prison for Abuse Cover-up

A former Tennessee Department of Correction (TDOC) tactical officer will serve more than a year in prison for covering up an excessive force incident for a fellow officer, the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced Tuesday. After pleading guilty in October, Sebron Hollards, 33, was sentenced this week to 15 months in prison and two years of supervised release for writing a false report in an effort to cover up another officer’s use of excessive force against an inmate at the Northwest Correctional Complex in Tiptonville. “Our country’s commitment to protecting its citizens’ civil rights doesn’t end at the prison gates,” said U.S. Attorney Kevin G. Ritz for the Western District of Tennessee.


His co-defendant, former tactical officer Javian Griffin, pleaded guilty on Oct. 11, 2023, to using excessive force against the inmate, according to WKRN. According to court documents, Hollands provided false information in his official report about Griffin’s use of unlawful force on an inmate. Hollands was present when Griffin, without justification, punched an inmate in the head, breaking the inmate’s jaw. The inmate did not resist or pose a threat justifying the use of force. Then, after the incident, Hollands provided false information in his official use of force report.

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